The Symposium Program

Date
Jan. 12 (Thu) & 13 (Fri), 2017
(a full-day program available on both days)

Time
8:10am - 3:00pm

Venue
Prince of Wales
Secondary School
(2250 Eddington Drive, Vancouver)
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Time Location Activity
8:10 – 8:40 Assembly Hall

Registration

8:40 – 8:45 (Auditorium)

Welcoming Remarks

David Derpak, Principal of Prince of Wales Secondary
Chrissa Rassias, Student Representative of Prince of Wales Secondary

8:45 – 8:50

Opening Remarks

Thekla Lit, President of BC ALPHA

8:50 – 9:10 Assembly Hall

Special Remarks – Towards Peace and Reconciliation

by Satoko Norimatsu, Founder of Peace Philosophy Centre in Vancouver

Ms. Norimatsu is the co-author of Resistant Islands Okinawa Confronts Japan and the United States, and the founder of Peace Philosophy Centre which was established on January 1st, 2007 to provide a community-based place where people of all backgrounds can gather and learn from each other to create a peaceful and sustainable world. The Centre’s activities include events, workshops, and lectures in the fields of peace, sustainability, education, and intercultural communication. Its area of focus is often Northeast Asia, and events are held in multiple languages such as English, Japanese, Korean, and Chinese.

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Dr. Joy Kogawa, born in Vancouver B.C. in 1935, is a writer living in Toronto. She is best known for her novel “Obasan.” Her most recent book is a children’s story, “Naomi’s Tree.” Her present work-in-progress is entitled, “Gently to Nagasaki.” She is a Member of the Order of Canada and the Order of British Columbia and has been awarded seven honorary doctorates and numerous prizes for her writing. In 2010, the Japanese government honored Kogawa with the Order of the Rising Sun “for her contribution to the understanding and preservation of Japanese Canadian history.”

9:10 – 9:30 Assembly Hall

Plenary 1: Backgrounder of Human Rights Violations during the Asia Pacific War

Presenters: Students of Prince of Wales Secondary, under the guidance of Ms. Jacqueline Siller, Head of SS Department at Prince of Wales Secondary.

Resource Person: Professor John Price, History Department of University of Victoria.

Professor Price is the author of “ORIENTING CANADA – Race, Empire and the Transpacific“. He served as a historian for the BC Ministry of Education teacher’s guide, “Human Rights in the Asia-Pacific 1931-1945: Social Responsibility and Global Citizenship“.
9:30 – 10:00 Assembly Hall

Plenary 2: Survivor’s Testimony

by Mr. Marius van Dijk van Nooten

Mr. Marius van Dijk van Nooten was born in the Netherlands in 1930 and grew up in the Dutch East Indies. He was eleven when Japan invaded in 1942. He was put into several concentration camps. After the war, he returned to the Netherlands and joined the merchant marines. In 1954, he moved to Canada and became a sea captain.

The testimony of survivor exposes students to the horrific realities of the Asia-Pacific War and gives them an awareness of the experiences of survivors of wars. More importantly, listening to a survivor’s testimony increases students’ compassion towards the suffering of others in a way that is both humbling and inspiring.
10:00 – 10:10

Break

10:10 – 11:40

Morning Workshop Session

WORKSHOP 1A
“Comfort Women” & Violence Against Women in War & Peace

Students will learn about the issue of “Comfort Women” and look at the issue through the lens of colonial, military, state, race, class and gender oppression. Since the 1990s, the “Comfort Women” issue has been at the forefront of the global movement combating violence against women during times of war. In 2007, the House of Commons of Canada unanimously passed a resolution to support proper acknowledgment and justice for the “Comfort Women” survivors. Other countries, including the US and the European Union, also passed similar parliamentary resolutions.

Presenters:
Christine Paget, West Vancouver School District, West Vancouver.

Ms. Paget met with survivors of Japanese military sexual slavery and visited related historical sites and museums during the Peace & Reconciliation Study Tour to China and Korea in the summer of 2012. She has developed a particular interest in Asian Holocaust Education because of family connection to this chapter of history – her granduncle was captured and suffered in Japanese POW camps during WWII. Besides being a SS teacher, she is now doing her PhD at Oxford University in the Faculty of Education and the Department of International and Comparative Education.

 

WORKSHOP 1B
“Comfort Women” & Violence Against Women in War & Peace

Co-Presenters:
Brenda Ball, Director of Brockton School, Independent.

Ms. Ball has been an educator and curriculum developer for over 20 years, in both public and independent schools, and both locally and overseas. Her focus is student engagement, and cultivating curiosity so that students take ownership over their learning and become active citizens. Other educational interests include curriculum innovation, technology integration & multimedia learning, global citizenship and service learning. Brenda was previously the Chairperson of the BC Social Studies Teachers Association Provincial Conference and is currently a curriculum developer on the curriculum review team for BC Social Studies K – 12 program.

Paula Waatainen, Vancouver Island University.

Ms. Waatainen met with survivors of the Asian Holocaust including a Korean survivor of Japanese military sexual slavery at the 2010 International Conference for Educators on the WWII History in Asia – Forgotten Voices, Living History. She is also a writing team member for the development of module on ““Comfort Women” & Violence Against Women in War & Peace”

 

WORKSHOP 2
Canadian Hong Kong veterans as POWs: Wounds and Closure

A total of 1,975 Canadian soldiers were sent to defend the British Colony of Hong Kong in 1941. Out of that group, 550 of them never returned home. In this workshop, students will make explicit connections between the Asia-Pacific War and Canada as they investigate the crimes against humanity committed against these Canadian prisoners of war. Students will also examine international agreements that were breached during this time in history. Finally, students will consider ways to bring proper closure to the Canadian Hong Kong veterans and their families.

Co-Presenters:
Lee Naylor, Hong Kong Veterans’ Commemorative Association Education Chair, BC, Region.

Mr. Lee Naylor is a retired 2nd Lieutenant. He is the eldest son of Staff Sergeant Howard E. Naylor CD, who was a member of the Royal Canadian Corps of Signals for twenty-five years. Staff Sergeant Naylor was a member of “C” Force which was the Canadian military contingent involved in the Battle of Hong Kong in December 1941 when he was captured by the Japanese Imperial Army and spent three years and nine months in POW camps in Hong Kong and Niigata Japan. As the Hong Kong Veterans Commemorative Association Education Chair for the BC Region he has reached out to hundreds of students, teachers and adults at various venues in the Lower Mainland and Vancouver Island. He is also a recipient of the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee Medal for his contribution in the education of the Canadian Hong Kong Veterans stories.

Ishbel Newstead, Aldergrove Community Secondary.

Ms. Newstead is a teacher assistant of Aldergrove Community Secondary. She has developed strong interest in Asian Holocaust Education and made presentations on the Rape of Nanking and the stories of the Canadian Hong Kong Veterans to Social Student 11 as well as History 12 students in her school.

 

WORKSHOP 3
Ethical Dimensions of Japan’s Medical and Biochemical Warfare Research

This workshop will trace the early development of medical and biochemical warfare research of Unit 731 prior to World War II. It will recount plans initiated by the Japanese military to carry these biological weapons to the shores of North America. Lastly we will look at the ethical issues raised by Unit 731, as well as the implications that medical and scientific research have on modern society.

Presenters:
Randy Matheson, Crofton House School, Vancouver.

Mr. Matheson is entering his 36th year of teaching Social Studies and History. He was a member of the 2012 Peace & Reconciliation Study Tour for Educators and visited the Unit 731 Museum in Harbin, in northeastern China where was the headquarters of Japan’s biological and chemical warfare during their occupation.

 

WORKSHOP 4
Rescuers and Global Citizenship in the Rape of Nanking

A group of over twenty foreigners (mostly American, but also some German, Danish, and Russian) established a neutral area in Nanking, called the International Safety Zone, to shelter Chinese refugees whose lives had been threatened by the invading Japanese soldiers. The committee members of the Safety Zone toiled to provide refugees with basic needs, and more importantly, to protect them from atrocities, often risking their own lives in the process. This workshop helps students to understand the spirit of global citizenship and the roles played by individuals in times of crisis: Perpetrator, Victim, Bystander, or Rescuer. Through an examination of individuals and events in the International Safety Zone, students will connect with history, develop an awareness of the personal strength and positive human qualities demonstrated by the committee members, and investigate what can be learned from their courage.

Presenters:
Danielle Zagar, Westview Secondary School, Maple Ridge.

Ms. Zagar is also Adjunct Professor of Global Competence Certificate Program – Human Rights, Columbia University. Social justice, youth leadership and empowerment, global education, and program and event development are just a few of her many interests. Ms. Zagar has over 16 years of experience as an educator, conference chair, curriculum and program developer in Canada. She met with survivors of the Asian Holocaust at the 2010 “International Conference for Educators on the WWII History in Asia – Forgotten Voices, Living History”.

Daniel Shiu, Lord Tweedsmuir Secondary, Surrey.

Mr. Shiu is a Social Studies teacher of Lord Tweedsmuir Secondary and an active member of Peace & Global Education (PAGE) of BCTF. . He has also been a seasonal instructor of School of Education, UBC. He participated in the 2005 Peace and Reconciliation Study Tour for Educators and met with survivors of the Asian Holocaust including those of the Rape of Nanking.

Workshop 4 (in French on Friday only)
Sauvetage et citoyenneté du monde lors du viol de Nankin

A Nankin, un groupe formé d’une vingtaine de ressortissants étrangers (principalement des Américains, ainsi que des Allemands, des Danois et des Russes), ont établi une zone neutre, que l’on appelait la zone internationale de sécurité, afin d’y abriter les réfugiés chinois dont la vie était menacée par l’invasion japonaise. Les membres du comité international de la zone de sécurité ont travaillé sans relâche pour répondre aux besoins essentiels des réfugiés et, plus particulièrement, pour les protéger des atrocités, et ce souvent au péril de leur propre vie. Cet atelier a pour objectif d’aider les étudiants à comprendre l’esprit de citoyenneté du monde, ainsi que les rôles qu’un individu peut jouer en temps de crise, que ce soit celui qui commet les crimes, la victime, le simple spectateur ou le sauveteur. A travers l’étude des individus et des événements au sein de la zone internationale de sécurité, les étudiants découvriront l’histoire et prendront conscience de la force personnelle et des qualités humaines positives chez les membres du comité. Enfin, ils mèneront une réflexion sur les leçons que nous pouvons tirer de leur courage.

Présentatrice:
Hamida Bendriss, Ecole secondaire Jules-Verne, Conseil scolaire francophone de la C.-B.

Mme Bendriss enseigne au sein du programme Francophone depuis dix-huit ans. Elle a notamment enseigné les Sciences Humaines, le Français Langue Première, Français IB et Théorie de la connaissance. Elle s’implique dans plusieurs organisations reliées à la Justice Sociale, l’inéquité, la diversité, l’éducation aux enfants et à la condition des femmes dans les pays en guerre.

 

WORKSHOP 5
Forgotten Holocaust – Atrocious Human Rights Violation and its Impact on Victims Now and Then

This workshop features the video documentary, Forgotten Holocaust, which contains stories of the Nanking Massacre, the “Comfort Stations” and forced labour during the Asia-Pacific War. Presenters will assist students in examining the immediate and long-term impacts of atrocious human rights violations against victims.

Co-Presenters:Pat Parungao, Retired from Gladstone Secondary, Vancouver.

Ms. Parungao worked as Head of Vancouver School Board’s Resource Services till 2007, then as Teacher Librarian of Gladstone Secondary School until her retirement in 2015. She was a participant of the 2006 Peace & Reconciliation Study Tour for Canadian Educators during which she personally met survivors of the Asian Holocaust including those of Nanking Massacre, Military Sexual slavery System, Biological Warfare and Slaved Labour. As a teacher librarian, she prepared a comprehensive bibliography related to the Asian Holocaust history for educators’ use.

Susan Pearson,Magee Secondary, Vancouver.

Ms. Susan Pearson is the Department Head of Resource Services, Magee Secondary School. She participated in the 2008 Peace & Reconciliation Study Tour for Educator during which she personally met with survivors of the Asian Holocaust.

Joan Muir, Retired from Eric Hamber Secondary School.

Joan Muir is a retired Teacher-Librarian from Eric Hamber Secondary School. Over her 41 years of teaching, in Ontario and B.C., she has taught in high school and in elementary school. She has served for many years on the executive committees of the Vancouver Teacher-Librarian Association as well as the B.C. Teacher-Librarian Association. She was a long time facilitator in the Roots of Empathy program which works to reduce bullying and violent behavior by teaching young children to be empathic to others.

 

WORKSHOP 6
Hiroshima, Nagasaki and beyond — Human Rights Violation within the Japanese Border

With more historical and structural understanding of Japanese imperialism and colonialism from the mid-19th century to 1945 and beyond, this workshop will explore why and how the Asian Holocaust happened. People of Hiroshima and Nagasaki were also victims of Japanese militarism and there were hundreds of thousands of Japanese, Korean, and Okinawan civilians who were brutally killed. These issues are examples of human rights violation within the Japanese border that need to be addressed. The role of atomic-bombing in the Japanese surrender and its political post-war significance will also be critically explored in the workshop.

Presenters:
Satoko Norimatsu, Founder of Peace Philosophy Centre in Vancouver

Ms. Norimatsu is the co-author of Resistant Islands Okinawa Confronts Japan and the United States, and the founder of Peace Philosophy Centre which was established on January 1st, 2007 to provide a community-based place where people of all backgrounds can gather and learn from each other to create a peaceful and sustainable world. The Centre’s activities include events, workshops, and lectures in the fields of peace, sustainability, education, and intercultural communication. Its area of focus is often Northeast Asia, and events are held in multiple languages such as English, Japanese, Korean, and Chinese.

 

11:40 – 12:40

Lunch Break

(Students are expected to bring their own lunch. Juice and cookies will be provided.)

* Exhibits on Canadian Hong Kong Veterans will be displayed

12:40 – 14:10

Afternoon Workshop Session

(Repeat of the workshops as listed in Morning Workshop Session. Participants will attend a different workshop, as assigned and indicated on their name tags.)

14:10 – 14:20

Student Reflection/Feedbacks Write-up

14:20 – 14:25

Break

14:25 – 14:45 (Auditorium)

Commemoration of Victims of the Asian Holocaust

14:45 – 15:00

Closing Remarks

by Thekla Lit, President of BC ALPHA

Ms. Lit is the Co-founder and Co-Chair of Canada ALPHA (Association for Learning & Preserving the History of WWII in Asia) and President of its BC Chapter. She has met with many survivors of the Asian Holocaust and visited museums and historical sites related to the Asia-Pacific War. She was also a writing team member of the BC Ministry of Education teacher’s guide, “Human Rights in the Asia-Pacific 1931-1945: Social Responsibility and Global Citizenship”.